Resilience, decision bias, and anti-social bliss [Venture Kindling]

This Venture Kindling post feature short bits of information I’ve tripped across or developed that can help you light a fire or revive a fire for your venture.

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Kindling from the web:

Making molehills out of mountains. What makes some people so resilient to adversity while others because drama queens (or kings) over a paper cut? Writing for The New Yorker, science writer, Maria Konnikova, explains How people learn to become resilient. It largely comes down to how we perceive our stressors: is the event a traumatic setback or an opportunity to learn and grow? Focus on the molehill and it will indeed become a mountain.

You’re just biased. Every decision we make is subject to bias. Business Insider collected 20 cognitive biases that screw up your decisions and put them into a pretty cool infographic. It’s a quick and handy way to confidently know your next important decision is bias-free. (Swallow that last line and you’ve just tasted the placebo effect.)

Anti-social bliss. Want to be less stressed? Be less social. The Guardian reports on a Danish study asking participants to take a week off from Facebook. Their findings? Participants felt 55% less stressed. Ironically, they felt less alone too. Sounds like a win-win. Now, go share this with your Facebook friends.

Latest personal kindling:

Start here. What’s keeping you from that thing you’ve always wanted to do, but someday will get around to it? Could it be all those other unfinished ideas? In our latest Reinventure Me podcast, How to start anything, Armin Assadi and talk about the resistance we have to starting the very thing we want to do. If you’re stuck, it may be a good place to start.


“Often the difference between a successful person and a failure is not one has better abilities or ideas, but the courage that one has to bet on one’s ideas, to take a calculated risk—and to act.”

— Maxwell Maltz


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